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2022 VIP Draft Kit


Table of Contents




Draft Day Advice
-General Advice
-Position Advice

-2022 NFL Schedule
-Strength of Schedule


QB Statistical Analysis
-2021 Top Performances
-2021 Most Fantasy Points
-2021 Most Avg Fantasy Points
-2021 Median Fantasy Points
-2021 Most Consistent
-Easiest 2022 Schedule
-Easiest 2022 Playoff Schedule

RB Statistical Analysis
-2021 Top Performances
-2021 Most Fantasy Points
-2021 Most Avg Fantasy Points
-2021 Median Fantasy Points
-2021 Most Consistent
-Easiest 2022 Schedule
-Easiest 2022 Playoff Schedule

WR Statistical Analysis
-2021 Top Performances
-2021 Most Fantasy Points
-2021 Most Avg Fantasy Points
-2021 Median Fantasy Points
-2021 Most Consistent
-Easiest 2022 Schedule
-Easiest 2022 Playoff Schedule

TE Statistical Analysis
-2021 Top Performances
-2021 Most Fantasy Points
-2021 Most Avg Fantasy Points
-2021 Median Fantasy Points
-2021 Most Consistent
-Easiest 2022 Schedule
-Easiest 2022 Playoff Schedule

Kicker Statistical Analysis
-2021 Top Performances
-2021 Most Fantasy Points
-2021 Most Avg Fantasy Points
-2021 Median Fantasy Points
-2021 Most Consistent
-Easiest 2022 Schedule
-Easiest 2022 Playoff Schedule

2021 Defense Rankings
-Fantasy Points Allowed (Total)
-Fantasy Points Allowed QBs
-Fantasy Points Allowed RBs
-Fantasy Points Allowed WRs
-Fantasy Points Allowed TEs
-Fantasy Points Allowed Ks

Proven Draft Strategy
-Numerical Analysis
-GCAM (Overview)
-GCAM (QBs)
-GCAM (RBs)
-GCAM (WRs)
-GCAM (TEs)
-GCAM (PKs)
-GCAM (D/ST)

Targets, Carries and Touches
-2021 Most Targets
-2021 Most Carries
-2021 Most Touches

Redzone Analysis
-2021 Redzone Passing
-2021 Redzone Rushing
-2021 Redzone Receiving
-2021 Redzone Touches

Depth Charts
-AFC East
-AFC North
-AFC South
-AFC West
-NFC East
-NFC North
-NFC South
-NFC West

Nagging Injuries
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs

Moving Truck Tracker
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs

Rookie Report
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs
-PKs
-Dynasty/Rookie Snapshot

Sophomore Status
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs
-PKs

Fantasy Studs
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs
-PKs
-D/ST

Sleepers
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs
-PKs
-D/ST

Duds
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs
-PKs
-D/ST

Average Draft Position
-Top 150
-QB
-RB
-WR
-TE
-PK
-D/ST
-DL
-LB
-DB

ATC Cheat Sheets
QB Rankings
RB Rankings
WR Rankings
TE Rankings
PK Rankings
Team Defense/Special Teams Rankings
DL Rankings
LB Rankings
DB Rankings
Draft Board Snapshot
Top 200 Players Overall
Top 216 Auction Values

MOCK DRAFT

Ask the Commish.Com
2022
Draft Kit

RB Rookies

 

Cook, James - BUF

Cook, James

Rookie running back James Cook has immediate sleeper fantasy appeal across all PPR formats based on his second-round draft capital, pass-catching prowess, explosiveness and offensive situation. The 5-foot-11, 199-pound running back has more than enough heft to manage a decent workload especially as a receiver out of the backfield. The 5-foot-7, 203-pound Devin Singletary was the RB3 over the last six weeks of the regular season when the Bills entrenched him as the featured guy. Cook with an ECR of RB44 seems priced closer to their floor than his ceiling considering Round 2 running backs have finished as top-36 running backs more than half the time (55%) since 2013.


Strong Jr., Pierre - NE

Strong Jr., Pierre


Harris, Kevin - NE

Harris, Kevin


Hall, Breece - NYJ

Hall, Breece

My highest-ranked rookie running back is Breece Hall. The Jets selected the Iowa State product at the top of Round 2, signifying his status as the team's locked-in RB1 for the foreseeable future. Hall's three-down skill set suggests he never has to come off the field, and the sheer volume he garners will vault him into redraft top-20 running back territory. The Iowa State product totaled over 4,500 yards from scrimmage, 50 touchdowns and 80 catches over three seasons in the college ranks. A workload of approximately 240 touches - based on ESPN fantasy analyst Mike Clay's projections and how many touches the cumulative Jets RB1 earned last season - would place Hall inside the top-15 considering every running back last season that hit that threshold finished inside that ranking. 2021 fourth-rounder Michael Carter had his moments as a rookie, but the Jets know he's just a No. 2 running back. Anticipate Hall to shoulder 15-20 touches per game based on the workload that Carter received last season when Tevin Coleman missed time. From Weeks 7-9 with Coleman sidelined, Carter averaged 19 touches per game and a 66% snap share. Upon Coleman's return from injury in Week 10, Carter averaged 14 touches per game and a 55% snap share in the games they played together.


Badie, Tyler - BAL

Badie, Tyler


Ford, Jerome - CLE

Ford, Jerome


Pierce, Dameon - HOU

Pierce, Dameon


Conner, Snoop - JAC

Conner, Snoop


Haskins, Hassan - TEN

Haskins, Hassan

Michigan's Hassan Haskins was one of my favorite running back sleepers before the NFL Draft. I claimed I'd be in on him if he got Round 4 draft capital, and Haskins did exactly that being selected 131st overall. He broke out in a big way as "the guy" for the Wolverines in 2021, earning a 23 percent dominator rating, raising his career dominator rating to 20 percent. With an identical PFF rushing grade to Breece Hall (91.6) over the last three seasons, Haskins looked primed to exceed expectations in the NFL. He offers a lot of size at 6-foot-2 and 228 pounds, so he can handle a heavy workload. The Michigan product also led his entire class in rushing attempts inside the five-yard line (29), which gives him a real shot at carving out a goal-line role in the pros. Haskins will never see the field as long as Derrick Henry stays healthy. But there's zero doubt in my mind that he's the clear direct back-up for Henry, who showed us last season that he is mortal.


White, Zamir - LV

White, Zamir


Spiller, Isaiah - LAC

Spiller, Isaiah

The Chargers are no strangers to taking shots on bigger but unathletic running backs on Day 3 of the NFL Draft. Joshua Kelley was the guy in 2020 and Larry Rountree was the guy in 2021. Isaiah Spiller represents the latest rehash of the Chargers trying to find an appropriate thunder to Austin Ekeler's lightning, and I for one think Spiller is already the best bet currently on the roster. The former Texas A&M running back has the capacity for three-down spot start duties with an all-encompassing skill set and desirable size - 6-feet and 217 pounds . Spiller should be a solid producer for the Chargers if given the opportunity although his lack of top-notch speed could keep him from being elite. He had only eight carries of 20-plus yards in 2021. But I'd be hard-pressed to ignore his impressive age-adjusted production as one of his most encouraging traits. Since Day 1 at Texas A&M, Spiller has been the lead dog for the Aggies. As a true freshman in 2019, he scored 10 rushing touchdowns and finished 16th in the nation in yards after contact per attempt en route to a 22% dominator rating. The power running back capped off his first year in impressive fashion with back-to-back seasons of 1,000 rushing yards and 100 missed tackles. Spiller also displayed receiving prowess, commanding at least an 8% target share and an average of 25 receptions per season. With Justin Jackson still an unsigned free agent, Spiller looks slated for instant impact in Year 1.


Robinson Jr., Brian - WAS

Robinson Jr., Brian


Ebner, Trestan - CHI

Ebner, Trestan


Chandler, Ty - MIN

Chandler, Ty


Allgeier, Tyler - ATL

Allgeier, Tyler


White, Rachaad - TB

White, Rachaad


Ingram, Keaontay - ARI

Ingram, Keaontay


Williams, Kyren - LAR

Williams, Kyren


Davis-Price, Tyrion - SF

Davis-Price, Tyrion

I didn't even think that highly of the San Francisco 49ers running back prior to the 2022 NFL Draft, citing his lack of elite explosiveness - seventh percentile vertical jump, 39th percentile broad jump - lack of pass-game pedigree and underwhelming 19% dominator rating during his final breakout season at LSU. With arguably the worst yards per scrimmage play in the class, TDP initially looked like a carbon copy of the 49ers' third-round pick last season Trey Sermon. His profile as a gap scheme runner makes the pick questionable to a zone-heavy team. Davis-Price is also not elusive - 29th in broken tackle rate per Sports Info Solutions - so he will require wide-open lanes to be effective. He also struggles to create yards after contact. His 2.8 yards after contact per attempt ranks 28th in the class. But all of these concerns are being baked into his free ADP, which isn't capturing his initial burst and long speed - 77th percentile 40-yard dash and 73rd percentile 10-yard split time - or the important metric regarding his Year 1 projection: Round 3 draft capital. And above all, the 49ers' offense breeds an efficient running game like no other. It's not hard to envision a scenario where the 49ers are forced to turn to their physical bruising rookie running back in the wake of a potential injury to an undersized Elijah Mitchell in 2022 or just use the two in tandem. San Fran's coaching staff liked the way Davis-Price bullied over defenders in the 4th quarters of games at the college level, so it's easy to picture him in a similar "finisher" role in the pros.


Walker III, Kenneth - SEA

Walker III, Kenneth

Kenneth Walker III made a massive splash upon transferring to Michigan State in 2021, leading his class in rushing yards (1,634), missed forced tackles (89) and explosive runs (46) en route to winning the Doak Walker Award -  an honor bestowed upon college football's best running back. His success earned him a 34% dominator rating, which considers the number of touchdowns and receiving yards a player commands within their offense. The number is solid considering Walker commanded just a 4% target share in his junior year, catching 13 passes for 80 receiving yards.  His massive accomplishments this past season were inevitable after he rushed for 13 touchdowns as PFF's 15th-best graded running back in 2020 as a sophomore at Wake.  With the second-most missed tackles forced over the past two seasons - trailing only Iowa State's Breece Hall - and third-most rushing yards after contact, Walker possesses the groundwork to be an effective rusher at the next level. Breaking tackles and creating after contact in college translates to the pros extremely well, as seen most recently by Denver Broncos running back Javonte Williams. Williams led the nation in missed tackle rate (48%) in his final season at North Carolina and would go on to lead the NFL in the same metric at the conclusion of his stellar rookie season.  Elusiveness is just one trait Walker has in common with Williams, as both skipped their senior years to enter the draft. Declaring early is a positive sign for a running back in dynasty formats, as they save themselves from another year of wear and tear.  The lack of work in the passing game is really the only major blemish on Walker's prospect profile because his testing at the NFL scouting combine was also exceptional. He weighed in at 211 pounds and ran a 4.38 40-yard dash (96th percentile). "The player I am avoiding is running back Kenneth Walker III. With a rookie draft ADP in the top-3, it's just too steep a price to pay for a running back that is projected to be used heavily on early downs on an offense that easily projects to be bottom-5 in the NFL led by the unsurprising duo of Drew Lock/Geno Smith at quarterback. Even if Walker can carve out a first-year workload similar to that of Chris Carson circa 2020 - 16.4 touches per game, 56% snaps share when healthy - it's still going to be a massive uphill battle for him to be a fantasy producer in Year 1. Pete Carroll has a stable of backs including Rashaad Penny, Travis Homer and DeeJay Dallas who all figure to work in at some point despite Walker's Round 2 draft capital. Again, even when Carson was the RB1, he was splitting snaps. Penny was brought back on a one-year deal for $5 million (12tth-highest cap hit), Chris Carson - if healthy - is due $6.1 million (10th-highest cap hit) and Homer/Dallas have routinely worked as pass-catchers out of the backfield. Seattle also finished dead-last in targets to the RB position last season, creating serious doubt that Walker will be used in that fashion in any capacity as a rookie. Part of that is on Russell Wilson's lack of juice in the screen game, but the offense itself doesn't predicate much RB pass-game usage. Geno Smith posted a meager 12% RB target rate (three per game) in his three starts last season. Drew Lock was at 17%. The Seahawks have the chance to be a running back by committee and dumpster fire on offense this season for all the reasons I've laid out, which is why I am adamantly against paying the premium for Walker. If this team falls behind in games, there's no telling which RB will even be on the field. I feel so much better about going with one of the many rookie WRs selected in Round 1 ahead of Walker based on his landing spot. Hopefully, opportunities should open in this backfield in Year 2 for Walker with Penny likely leaving in free agency. But does he get replaced with another Day 2 running back? Will Seattle's offense even be efficient in 2023 and beyond? So much uncertainty with thi




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